Videos

Ravel, Jeux d'Eau

From the April 6, 2009 solo recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. "Jeux" literally means "games", and "d'eau" means "of water". This could be translated as "the playing of water" and the piece is sometimes called "The Fountain(s)" or "Water Games", although Ravel said that he was inspired by the sound of waterfalls, brooks, and water spraying. An inscription at the top of the score says, "The god of the rivers laughs from the water which tickles him." Maurice Ravel dedicated the piece to his teacher, Gabriel Fauré. At three points, Ravel wrote the lowest note on the piano, an A, when it is preceded by the two G#s above it. Because I am playing a Bösendorfer piano with extra keys in the bass, I sound the low G# instead of A at 2:59, 3:20, and 3:30.

Scriabin, Nocturne for Left Hand

From the April 6, 2009 solo recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. Scriabin's Prelude for Left Hand, Opus 9 No. 1 pairs with this piece, but that was omitted from this performance since the Nocturne, Opus 9 No.2, was played alone as an encore.

Jeffrey Chappell, Jazz Sonata

From the April 6, 2009 solo recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland, with the composer at the piano. Purchase the printed score of this and other Chappell compositions HERE
Purchase the professional audio recording at iTunes http://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/jeffrey-chappell/id268784041
or from the record label at
http://www.centaurrecords.com/?CRCs=2772.
The title is a play on words: an opening is that which begins something, such as the first movement of a sonata; but here the word also refers to a sense of expanding, of blossoming, which this piece of music does all the way to the end.

Chopin, Waltz in Eb Major

From the October 4, 2009 recital on the Bosendorfer Imperial Grand Piano at Frederick (MD) Community College. This Waltz, which is Chopin's opus 18, is the first one he published.

Brahms, Rhapsody in G Minor

From the October 4, 2009 recital on the Bosendorfer Imperial Grand Piano at Frederick (MD) Community College. Although titled "Rhapsody", this piece is actually in a strict sonata-allegro form. It is Opus 79 No. 2.

Rachmaninoff, Third Concerto - First Movement, Part 1

Read about this performance at http://jeffreychappell.com/blog/?s=Rachmaninoff+Third%2C+Part+One Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor, opus 30 by Sergei Rachmaninoff, performed by Jeffrey Chappell with the Frederick Symphony Orchestra conducted by Elisa Koehler on May 7, 2011 at Frederick Community College, Frederick, Maryland.

Rachmaninoff, Third Concerto - First Movement, Part 2

Read about this performance at http://jeffreychappell.com/blog/?s=Rachmaninoff+Third%2C+Part+One Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor, opus 30 by Sergei Rachmaninoff, performed by Jeffrey Chappell with the Frederick Symphony Orchestra conducted by Elisa Koehler on May 7, 2011 at Frederick Community College, Frederick, Maryland.

Rachmaninoff, Third Concerto - Second Movement

Read about this performance at http://jeffreychappell.com/blog/?s=Rachmaninoff+Third%2C+Part+One Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor, opus 30 by Sergei Rachmaninoff, performed by Jeffrey Chappell with the Frederick Symphony Orchestra conducted by Elisa Koehler on May 7, 2011 at Frederick Community College, Frederick, Maryland.

Rachmaninoff, Third Concerto - Third Movement

Read about this performance at http://jeffreychappell.com/blog/?s=Rachmaninoff+Third%2C+Part+One Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor, opus 30 by Sergei Rachmaninoff, performed by Jeffrey Chappell with the Frederick Symphony Orchestra conducted by Elisa Koehler on May 7, 2011 at Frederick Community College, Frederick, Maryland.

Beethoven, Sonata Opus 78 - First Movement

From the October 4, 2009 recital on the Bosendorfer Imperial Grand Piano at Frederick (MD) Community College. Unusual for its key of F# Major and for being in only two movements, this sonata was once declared by Beethoven to be his favorite. Its dedication to Therese von Brunswick, a strong candidate for the identity of Beethoven's "Immortal Beloved", could explain his remark.

Beethoven, Sonata Opus 78 - Second Movement

From the October 4, 2009 recital on the Bosendorfer Imperial Grand Piano at Frederick (MD) Community College. Unusual for its key of F# Major and for being in only two movements, this sonata was once declared by Beethoven to be his favorite. Its dedication to Therese von Brunswick, a strong candidate for the identity of Beethoven's "Immortal Beloved", could explain his remark.

Walter Gross, Tenderly

From the April 6, 2009 solo recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. Jeffrey Chappell's solo piano arrangement of this American popular song plays with the title by beginning roughly, but it eventually works its way around to a tender treatment of the tune.

Charles Strouse, Tomorrow

From the April 6, 2009 solo recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. Jeffrey Chappell's arrangement of the famous tune from the Broadway show, "Annie". The first half might be nicknamed "Annie Sings The Blues", but in the second half the sun comes out in a big way.

Jay McShann, Hootie Blues

From the April 6, 2009 solo recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. "Hootie" was Jay McShann's nickname. Charlie Parker made his first commercial recording with this tune. This unattributed arrangement appears in "Jazz, Blues, Boogie, & Swing for Piano" published by MCA/Mills, but the notation of swing rhythm is inconsistent throughout and needs careful decoding.

Brahms, Concerto No. 2 - First Movement

The first movement of Piano Concerto No. 2, opus 83 by Johannes Brahms is marked "Allegro non troppo". This performance by pianist Jeffrey Chappell took place on March 12, 2012 with the South Florida Symphony Orchestra conducted by Sebrina Maria Alfonso at the Broward Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The other three movements from this performance are also on YouTube. To view even more videos by this pianist, visit the YouTube channel jeffreychappellpiano.

Brahms, Concerto No. 2 - Second Movement

The second movement of Piano Concerto No. 2, opus 83 by Johannes Brahms is marked "Allegro appassionato". This performance by pianist Jeffrey Chappell took place on March 12, 2012 with the South Florida Symphony Orchestra conducted by Sebrina Maria Alfonso at the Broward Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The other three movements from this performance are also on YouTube. To view even more videos by this pianist, visit the YouTube channel jeffreychappellpiano.

Brahms, Concerto No. 2 - Third Movement

The third movement of Piano Concerto No. 2, opus 83 by Johannes Brahms is marked "Andante". This performance by pianist Jeffrey Chappell took place on March 12, 2012 with the South Florida Symphony Orchestra conducted by Sebrina Maria Alfonso at the Broward Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The other three movements from this performance are also on YouTube. To view even more videos by this pianist, visit the YouTube channel jeffreychappellpiano.

Brahms, Concerto No. 2 - Fourth Movement

The fourth movement of Piano Concerto No. 2, opus 83 by Johannes Brahms is marked "Allegretto grazioso". This performance by pianist Jeffrey Chappell took place on March 12, 2012 with the South Florida Symphony Orchestra conducted by Sebrina Maria Alfonso at the Broward Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The other three movements from this performance are also on YouTube. To view even more videos by this pianist, visit the YouTube channel jeffreychappellpiano.

Mozart, Fantasty and Fugue in C Major, K.394

From the March 31, 2015 recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. One of Mozart's most unusual compositions, the improvisatory freedom of the Fantasy contrasts boldly with the regulated structure of the Fugue.

Free Improvisation

From the March 31, 2015 recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. The piece was created as it was played, with no advance planning.

Chopin, Berceuse, Opus 57

From the March 31, 2015 recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. A "berceuse" is a song that is sung while rocking a baby. Chopin's sublime example is exceptional because the left hand part repeats the same progression 54 times (out of a total of 70 measures) while above it the right hand part unfurls a series of constantly changing figurations.

Ginastera, Sonata 1 - Fourth Movement

From the March 31, 2015 recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. Marked "Ruvido ed ostinato" ("rough and obstinate"), the work's relentless rhythms and acrobatic technical demands mark it as one of the great 20th-century piano compositions.

Ravel, Gaspard de la Nuit - Ondine

From the March 31, 2015 recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. "Gaspard de la Nuit" translates as "Keeper of the Treasures of the Night" and is the title of a collection of prose-poems by the French author Aloysius Bertrand. Ravel took three of these prose-poems and used them as inspiration, giving the resulting piece the subtitle of "Three Poems for Piano". "Ondine" tells the tale of a water sprite who beckons a human to become her mate by describing all of the glories of her underwater kingdom. But when she finishes her enticing song, he tells her that he is in love with a woman, and she spitefully dives back into the lake with a splash.

Ravel, Gaspard de la Nuit - Le Gibet

From the March 31, 2015 recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. "Gaspard de la Nuit" translates as "Keeper of the Treasures of the Night" and is the title of a collection of prose-poems by the French author Aloysius Bertrand, whose writing was influenced by that of Edgar Allen Poe. Ravel took three of these prose-poems and used them as inspiration, giving the resulting piece the subtitle of "Three Poems for Piano". "Le Gibet" ("The Scaffold") consists of a series of grisly questions about the sound that is heard in the vicinity of a hanged man: is it a fly buzzing around the man's deaf ears; or perhaps a spider spinning a cravat around the strangled neck; etc.? The answer is that it is the sound of a bell tolling from the walls of a city below the horizon. This bell is represented by Ravel as the note B flat, which sounds continuously through 6 minutes of music as he reharmonizes it over and over again in a display of compositional virtuosity.

Ravel, Gaspard de la Nuit - Scarbo

From the March 31, 2015 recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. "Gaspard de la Nuit" translates as "Keeper of the Treasures of the Night" and is the title of a collection of prose-poems by the French author Aloysius Bertrand, whose writing was influenced by that of Edgar Allen Poe. Ravel took three of these prose-poems and used them as inspiration, giving the resulting piece the subtitle of "Three Poems for Piano". "Scarbo" tells of a demonic being who appears to a man at night when he tries to go to sleep, tormenting him by scratching on the bed curtains and dive-bombing around the room, at times spinning like a top, at other times growing to gigantic size or shrinking to nothing, ending by glowing blue and suddenly becoming extinguished like a candle flame. Ravel had the intention for "Scarbo" to be the most difficult piano piece ever written.

Faure, Ballade, Opus 19

From the March 8, 2017 solo recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland. Composed in 1877, this work from Fauré's early compositional period defined a new approach to keyboard writing that influenced later French composers such as Ravel and Debussy. Fauré also created a version of this piece for piano and orchestra.

Chopin, Ballade in G Minor, Opus 23

From the March 8, 2017 solo recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland.

George Gershwin, Rhapsody in Blue

From the March 8, 2017 recital at Goucher College in Baltimore, Maryland.

Chick Corea, Florida - Performance Interview

Sonata for Alto Sax and Piano - Chick Corea, Florida